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OUR SECURITY

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STOP PRESS:  Do you have new information or evidence to add to an existing crime report?
If you have the crime reference number, you can update the report online here:
https://met.police.uk/contact/af/contact-us/us/a-crime-that-has-already-been-reported/

The Metropolitan Police Safer Neighbourhoods Team have an effective partnership with Neighbourhood Watch Representatives from Highlands and adjoining areas.
This falls under the banner of CAPE (Community Action Partnership Enfield) and is supported by Committee Members of WERA.
CAPE meetings cover a range of issues generated by discussion about reported crimes, perceived trends, threats to security, local observations, insights and ideas.
CAPE members, Neighbourhood Watch representatives and SNT Officers are also active on a WhatsApp group which posts crime alerts and information about suspicious activity, including video recordings. 
The same material can be posted to https://www.met.police.uk/a/your-area/met/enfield/highlands/

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When should I use 999 or 101?

You should always call 999 when it is an emergency, such as when a crime is in progress, someone suspected of a crime is nearby, when there is danger to life or when violence is being used or threatened.
You should call 101 to report crime and other concerns that do not require an emergency response.  For example, if: 



Alternatively, you can call the Highlands SNT number regarding general enquires or crime issues (calls cost approximately 15 pence per min).

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Neighbourhood Watch:  Enfield Metropolitan Police Service is actively trying to encourage more streets to set up their own Neighbourhood Watch Schemes.  Although Highlands Ward already incorporates a well run scheme the Met. Safer Neighbourhoods Team is keen to expand the network. 


A Neighbourhood Watch scheme is a way to get to know your neighbours and discuss security issues affecting the area and how to deal with them.  Many 'door-to-door visits' reveal that everyone has the same problems but no one knows or talks to anyone; whether police or neighbours.  The Scheme is also a great way to alert others to local issues.  An officially set-up Scheme can also access police crime statistics and other data.  It can even receive a visit from local SNT Officers.

During daily patrols your Police Community Support Officers are often informed of suspicious behaviour on the Ward.  Sometimes this has occurred in previous months and so valuable opportunities are lost.  Watch teams aim to provide more direct contact, allowing residents to get involved, be vigilant for each other and make a difference.  Neighbourhood Watch residents complement the Met. Safer Neighbourhoods Teams as 'ears and eyes' on the street.  Police can then use information volunteered to garner intelligence, map movements and even prosecute suspects based on witness reports.

To set up your own you could either call your Safer Neighbourhood team to deliver you a pack, or visit the “Our Watch” website which can give you lots of information on what it means to be a Neighbour watch coordinator.  http://www.ourwatch.org.uk/

Is your house left in the dark about security?
A house in total darkness is more appealing to a criminal than one with lights on as it indicates that your home might not be occupied.  This can encourage a burgler to attempt entry and puts any sleeping occupants at risk of harm.  It may be worth thinking about installing timer switches or window vibration sensors if you are likely to be away until late.  Ensure windows 
also are locked shut whilst you are not at home.

Please remember to double lock your front doors whether you have a UPVC door or a Yale and mortice lock.
If you also have a UPVC porch door then double lock that too.  If you have security installed please use it.

Officers have been patrolling the streets identifying vulnerable houses and leaving "while you were out" cards to highlight to residents any vulnerability.  Officers are willing to attend addresses to give crime prevention advice and you are welcome to phone your local safer neighbourhoods officers to obtain this.

Home Security Guidelines


High winds and heavy rain cause damage to fences.  Please look at getting them secured. Likewise, if neighbours’ fences are damaged this could leave your premises exposed too. The team is delivering ‘While You Were Out’ cards whilst patrolling.  If you receive one of these it means your house looked vulnerable and officers will leave comments as to why houses in darkness give the appearance no-one is at home.  Side or back-gate open or unlocked affords opportunist access to the rear of your house.  If you receive a card please act on the comments and if you need any advice please contact the team.  Here are the key messages of crime prevention advice.


 


Don't leave your keys or ID documents within easy reach of doors, letterboxes or windows. 


Close and lock all doors and windows.  Make sure you close windows at night time - even when you are in bed.
Remember:  ground floor windows and doors are easily accessible for burglars. 
If you have multi-locking door handles, lift the handle, lock it with the key and remove it:  LIFT - LOCK - REMOVE.  Put the key in a safe place out of sight in case of fire.
Lock garages and sheds so garden tools and ladders can’t be used to break into your home.  Padlock or chain ladders to a strong post or wall.
The value of garage or shed contents such as mowers, power tools, strimmers and cycles can often be substantial.  
If you also have a UPVC porch door then double lock that too.
 


Keep side gates locked and wheelie bins stored behind them. 


Use timer switches linked to lights and a radio so it appears that someone is at home. 


Invest in a safe for valuables and sentimental items and securely fix it to a solid surface. 


Install a visible intruder alarm system - burglars don't want to be seen or heard.  If you have the security installed, then please use it. 


Install low level 'dusk till dawn' lighting to increase visibility and deter burglars. 


Keep side and rear boundaries high to restrict access and front boundaries low to remove hiding places. 


Photograph and mark valuables and sentimental items with your postcode and housenumber/name. Register items with serial numbers at:  www.immobilise.com


 


If you are going to be away for an extended period you will need to take additional action.  Consider asking your neighbours to close curtains, or park on your drive.  Cancel milk or other deliveries if you will be absent for more than a few days.

SECURING YOUR BOUNDARIES
Making your home as difficult to get into as possible will help deter criminals, and that starts with your boundaries. 
Make sure your front wall is no more than 1 metre high, so a burglar could be seen from the street.  Make your side and driveway gates are the same height as the boundaries around them. 


Metal side and driveway gates are good because they allow intruders to be seen.  Add extra security with an anti-climb top. 


Rear and side boundaries should be between 1.8 and 2 metres high.  Use trellis as a means to deter climbing over gates and fences. 


Gravel driveways and paths make a silent approach difficult.  Ask a neighbour to park a vehicle on your empty drive if you are away. 


Store wheelie bins or other potential climbing aids behind locked gates, so burglars can’t climb up on them and use them as a ladder. 


Wooden gates can be secured with two hasps and staples and two closed shackle padlocks near the top and the bottom, to prevent leverage. 


Planting dense or spiky climbing plants acts as an additional deterrent.  Grow bushes and hedges at the rear of properties leading to open spaces. 
Trim back overgrown hedges, bushes and trees that obstruct premises from view from the street at the front of your property.
 


Be aware that using barbed wire, carpet grippers or broken glass on top of walls or fences could cause injury, for which the occupier could be liable.


 


ALARMS:  Alarms are undoubtably the most effective deterrent against burglary.  To maximize the deterrent, place external active burglar alarm bell boxes (with flashing lights and sounders) at the front and back of the property.  Police recommend an installer who is affiliated to an in inspectorate, either the National Security Inspectorate (NSI) or Security System and Alarms Inspection Board (SSAIB).  Be aware that DIY alarms will not necessarily receive a police response.


 


Use security lights with infrared sensors.  For CCTV (Check Data Protection Act and Local Council Laws). 


Mark or etch your property with your postcode, house or flat number or the first three letters of your house name.
Register any items with a serial number at www.immobilise.com.
 


Highlands SNT officers continue to patrol areas reported to have anti-social behaviour issues, and visit victims of crime in the ward.

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